Women Before the Bar: Gender, Law and Society in Connecticut, 1639-1789

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Essay #: 063707
Total text length is 9,064 characters (approximately 6.3 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Women Before the Bar: Gender, Law and Society in Connecticut, 1639-1789
The common phrase “history is written by the victors” is something that is often encountered within an educational setting. It means that those who persevered, who fought, and who eventually came out on top write history. It means that the viewpoints and predominant opinions expressed are those who achieve dominance in a society. The voices of the losers, or those who do not fit a popular system or cultural background, often get left by the wayside. In Cornelia Hughes Dayton’s text, Women Before the Bar: Gender, Law & Society in Connecticut, 1639-1789, she seeks to explore how the patterns of women’s participation before the rise of colonialism and a definitively...
The end:
.....omething each and every one of us needs to piece together in order to better understand. It’s hard to get the full story from just one source, or even a handful. Cornelia Hughes Dayton explores a point in history through meticulous data collection and analysis, proving a point that goes against predominant assumptions about the period. She does a wonderful job in her book, Women Before The Bar. There should be more books like this one that explore a relatively unknown facet of history.
Works Cited
Dayton, Cornelia Hughes. Women Before the Bar: Gender, Law
& Society in Connecticut, 1639-1789. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1995.
Foner, Eric. Give Me Liberty! An American History (2nd ed). USA: Matrix Publishing Services, 2009.