Women as Feminist Storytellers in the Writings of Zora Neale Huston and Maxine Hong Kingston

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Essay #: 058202
Total text length is 8,245 characters (approximately 5.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of the Contrasting Mythological and Familial Voice of Women as Feminist Storytellers in the Writings of Zora Neale Huston and Maxine Hong Kingston
This literary study will analyze the contrasting relations to the power of the female voice through the mythological and familial focus that is used in Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston and The Warrior Women: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts by Maxine Hong Kingston. While Kingston relies heavily on a family history to dictate the power of the voice in relation to feminist identity, the power of Chinese myth plays a larger role than that of the oral history transferred from generation to generation in Hurston’s African American feminist identity. In this manner,...
The end:
.....xt generation. While Kingston also uses a familial context in which to tell a family history, the element of Chinese myth and folklore play a larger role in teaching a cautionary tale to Kingston as a child. The ghosts of Kingston’s storytelling ‘voice’ helps to expand and to abstract the abuses that women suffer at the hands of men through Chinese mythological traditions. These are the differing ways in which these two authors express a voice of power via the historical and mythic ways in which they describe a feminist self in their writings.
Works Cited:
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial, 1998.
Kingston, Maxine Hong. The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts. New York: Vintage, 1989.