Wilderness as Text in the Writings of Catharine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie

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Essay #: 062009
Total text length is 12,777 characters (approximately 8.8 pages).

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The beginning:
Wilderness as Text in the Writings of Catharine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie
Catharine Parr Traill (1802-1899) and Susanna Moodie, sisters and authors, present a fascinating contrast in the way they reacted to the Canadian wilderness after their emigration to Canada in 1832. It is common knowledge that while Traill remained calm and optimistic, Moodie saw her experience in much more negative terms. I propose below to compare their respective reactions by looking at how each author "read" the experience she had undertaken: the vocabulary she chose, the narratives she preferred, and the concepts that informed the whole. My material will be drawn from autobiographical accounts: Traill's The Backwoods of Canada and Moodie's Roughing It in...
The end:
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Steffler, Margaret, and Neil Steffler. "'If we would read it aright': Traill's 'Ladder to Heaven.'" Journal of Canadian Studies 38.3 (2004): 123-152. EBSCO Academic Source Premier, 3 August 2010.
Thomas, Christa Zeller. "'I had never seen such a shed called a house before.' The Discourse of Home in Susanna Moodie's Roughing It in the Bush." Canadian Literature 203 (2009): 105-121. EBSCO Academic Source Premier, 3 August 2010.