Water Pricing and Scarcity in the United States, China, Germany and the Global South

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Essay #: 066823
Total text length is 32,282 characters (approximately 22.3 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Ecology, Community, Economy: Water Pricing and Scarcity in the United States, China, Germany, and the Global South
Clean water is, in a sense, invaluable: we cannot live without it. For this reason, there are those who argue that water is other than or more than a commodity: they argue that it is a human right or, more accurately, a water commons. When water is defined as a commodity, a good for which one must pay, privatization of its treatment and distribution is encouraged. When water is defined as a human right, a basic need to which every person of any means ought to have access, public, government, or community treatment and distribution is encouraged. Compounding this basic ideological schism among academics, experts, and activists...
The end:
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