Viewpoint of Oppression and Revolutionary Enlightenment in Kui’s “Paperboy”

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 054167
Total text length is 7,595 characters (approximately 5.2 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Viewpoint of Oppression and Revolutionary Enlightenment in Kui's "Paperboy"
What is the viewpoint of the narrator in “Paperboy,” and how does it influence how we interpret this story of oppression and revolutionary enlightenment?
This paper argues that the viewpoint of the narrator of Yang Kui’s short story Paperboy is that of the slightly prejudiced outsider, who is at the same time a decent and honest young man, striving to be fair. Further, this viewpoint enables the narrator to deliver a critique of the society in Tokyo that is all the more damning for its nuanced attempt to remain fair, despite the horrendous events that happen to him. This story was censored half-way through its initial serialization, but the author’s account of the...
The end:
.....newspaper out of pity for him. Thus, the reader is inclined to take this damning indictment very seriously. The reader trusts the narrator, who seems to be decent and fair, despite his circumstances. Thus, the reader concludes that the critique is valid, and that there are indeed some Japanese business men who take advantage of the unemployment situation in order to viciously exploit innocent young men. Thus, the viewpoint of the narrator in Paperboy turns out to be that of the outsider who is able to efficiently critique the story, due to his own honest personality. This influences us to interpret this story as a true story of oppression and revolutionary enlightenment.
Bibliography
Kui, Yang. Paperboy. Translated by Rosemary Haddon. 1932.