Use of Ritual as Statecraft: Shared Principles of Sun Tzu, Hsun Tzu, and Al Ghazali

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 067278
Total text length is 6,534 characters (approximately 4.5 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Use of Ritual as Statecraft: Shared Principles of Sun Tzu, Hsun Tzu, and Al Ghazali
Sun Tzu,
Hsun
Tzu, and Al
Ghazali
all exercised their lives in different eras, with decidedly different cultural, political, and religious forces. Though they differ in these areas they also share the similar view of how ritual or the repetitive activities of a human being can be useful in directing the population of a people towards a desired end. Each man has different ends in mind, yet the means they advise through which these gains can be achieved are strikingly similar. Although Sun Tzu,
Hsun
Tzu, and Al
Ghazali
Mead may not share much from an outside view, their similarities demonstrate the power of the use of ritual to control the population of a...
The end:
.....un
Tzu, and Al
Ghazali
differed, and their perspectives of those societies differed. Yet they share the sensibility that man is little more than an animal until he is able to be transformed through the repetition of purposeful behavior in a common goal. The
state,
or even a God may be the used to unify the people of a society, but the actions of the people transforms society through the repetition of acts, and is the most effective way at controlling a productive society. The similar views of Sun Tzu,
Hsun
Tzu, and Al
Ghazali
of the validity of ritual demonstrate the power of ritual to control the population toward a higher end.
Works Cited:
Austin, Michael. Reading the world: ideas that matter. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2007. Print.