Two Substances Meeting Like Magic

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Essay #: 065219
Total text length is 11,011 characters (approximately 7.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Two Substances Meeting Like Magic
“Two substances meeting like magic” (Clements 39). These are the mysterious words of Rose in Marie Clements’ play, Burning Vision. Specifically, they refer to the coming together of natural elements. The coming together, in turn, produces one of the most terrible weapons ever created – the nuclear bomb. The mysterious transformation of substances from natural and life supporting to destructive is one of the major themes of the play. Such a focus on mysterious coming-together is not only found in this play. Two other pieces of art also deal with the subject. One of those other works of art is Joe Sacco’s Palestine. The other is Neill
Blomkamp’s
District 9. The works of art all deal, not so much with the...
The end:
.....his fact because it would suggest that perhaps their measures of controlling the aliens are too extreme. The final work considered was the play Burning Vision. The play deals with the accidental discovery of uranium. The government tries to keep the potential uses of the uranium separate from the actual uranium. The play argues that there is no difference. Discovering uranium is just as destructive as dropping an atomic bomb. The coming together of substances often reveals the similarities that were always there, but simply hidden by another authority.
Works Cited
Clements, Marie. Burning Vision. Vancouver: Talon Books, 2003.
District 9. Dir. Neill
Blomkamp
.
WingNut
Pictures, 2009.
Sacco, Joe. Palestine. Seattle:
Fantagraphics
Books, 2001.