Theodor Adorno’s Critique of Pop Music

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Essay #: 054578
Total text length is 6,161 characters (approximately 4.2 pages).

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The beginning:
Theodor Adorno’s Critique of Pop Music
Known for his hostility to jazz and to popular music in general, Theodor
Adorno
regards it as a drug utilized by the establishment to mollify the hoi polloi. According to
Adorno
, with the commencement of music being consumed by the masses also
came
the loss of its naturalness, autonomy, and intellectual constituent.
Adorno
posits that the unoriginality indistinctive of popular music is such that preference by its listeners simply depends upon an individual’s “biographical details or on the situation in which things are heard” (
Adorno
, 2003, p. 30). He says that consumers of popular music:
have
key points in common with the man who must kill time because he has nothing else on which to vent his...
The end:
..... features of a changed value philosophy.
Adorno’s
theory of music, contrary to the opinion of most of his critiques, was not based on an elitist position, but rather, on one of social awareness which endeavored for truth in music and philosophy.
References
Adorno
, T.W. (1990).
On popular music.
In S.
Frith
& A. Goodwin
(Eds.),
On
record: rock, pop and the written word (pp. 256-267). New York:
Routledge
.
Adorno
, T.W. (2003). On the fetish character in music and the
Regression of listening.
In J.M. Bernstein (Ed.), The Culture Industry: selected essays on culture. (pp. 29-60). New York:
Routledge
.
Leppert
, R. (2005). Music “pushed to the edge of existence”
(
Adorno
, listening and the question of hope).
Cultural Critique, 60, 92-133.