The Way of Warfare, The Way of Command

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Essay #: 057291
Total text length is 7,546 characters (approximately 5.2 pages).

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The beginning:
The Way of Warfare, The Way of Command
StudentFirstName StudentLastName
StudentNumber
Department of History
History 484
Section X
February 8, 2010
THE WAY OF WARFARE, THE WAY OF COMMAND
The Way of Warfare and the Way of Command are topics which are elucidated in great detail in The Essence of War: Leadership and Strategy from the Chinese Military Classics. One question which can be posed is whether there is consensus among the various authors within the aforementioned text. The case is made that while the authors have different perspectives on these topics, there are a number of instances when their views definitively intersect.
In the Art of War 2, Sun Tzu described that "the highest realization of warfare is to attack the enemy's plans;...
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..... be considered a basic formula for creating advantageous circumstances. Thus, while each other was discussing seemingly different topics, in some sense, they were simply approaching the same basic logic from polar opposite ends of the argument. As with many of the authors, they describe war and command in philosophical terms. While their viewpoints cover enormous ground, the essence of most of their wisdom comes back to basic principles: making war and being in command can be exercised with greater degrees of success if one uses thinking, philosophy, and wisdom rather than simply brute force.
Bibliography
Sawyer, Ralph D. The Essence of War: Leadership and Strategy from the Chinese Military
Classics. 2004. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2004.