The Viking, Muslim, and Magyar Invasions of Europe During the Ninth and Tenth Centuries

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Essay #: 051723
Total text length is 17,274 characters (approximately 11.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Viking, Muslim, and Magyar Invasions of
Europe During the Ninth and Tenth Centuries
The Background
When Charlemagne died in 814, Louis the Pious, his sole surviving son, succeeded him as emperor. However, he attempted to invoke the Roman instead of the Frankish law of succession, and give sole reign to his eldest son, Charles the Bald, at the expense of Charles’ half brothers, Louis and Lothair. This precipitated civil war between his greedy and unscrupulous sons. Louis and Lothair rose up against this and began a series of civil wars, which ended when Charles and Louis joined forces against Lothair. All three warring parties eventually agreed to a truce with the Treaty of Verdun in 843. West Francia was given to Charles the Bald, East...
The end:
.....akers and the end of Islam. London & New York: Routledge-Curzon, 2003.
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Sawyer, Peter. “The Age of the Viking and Before.” Chapter 1. Ed. Peter Hayes Sawyer. The Oxford Illustrated History of the Vikings. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. 1–18.
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Trevelyan, Janet Penrose. A Short History of the Italian People from the Barbarian Invasions to the Attainment of Unity. New York: Putnam, 1920.
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