The Value of Life in “The Myth of Sisyphus” and “The Meaning of Life”

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Essay #: 071959
Total text length is 10,591 characters (approximately 7.3 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Value of Life in "The Myth of Sisyphus" and "The Meaning of Life"
The topic of this paper is how the ancient Greek myth of Sisyphus is used in philosophy to explore the question of the meaning of life. This paper will examine two philosophical readings of this myth: The Myth of Sisyphus (Camus 1942) and “The Meaning of Life” (Taylor 1967). In detailing how first Albert Camus and then Richard Taylor use this myth to develop a solution to the question of the meaning of life, the paper will delineate the strengths and the errors of each approach. This paper will argue the thesis that, on balance, Camus’ treatment is the most legitimate use of the myth and – proceeding from this – will contend that the concept of “happiness” is integral to...
The end:
.....existence, in a way that Taylor’s does not. As long as we are conscious, and free in our own minds, humans can discover a heaven in hell (and, conversely, a hell in heaven). Our human consciousness gives us the power to recognize the meaningless absurdity of existence, and links us to the mythic figures of Sisyphus and Oedipus.
References
Camus, A. (1942). The Myth of Sisyphus. Rpt.1955, 1983.
Trans. J. O’Brien. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Reprinted in
The Meaning of Life: A Reader Third Edition. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2008, pp.72-81.
Taylor, R. (1967). From Good and Evil. Rpt.2000. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, pp.256-268. Reprinted in
The Meaning of Life: A Reader Third Edition. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2008, pp.134-142.