The Ukiyo-e Woodblock Print in Pre-Modern Japan

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Essay #: 056221
Total text length is 9,428 characters (approximately 6.5 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Ukiyo-e Woodblock Print in Pre-Modern Japan
The Tokugawa or Edo period of Japanese history lasted for approximately 250 years between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. During this time period, woodblock prints became one of the best-known and widely circulated forms of visual imagery in Japan. Japanese woodblock prints were initially created during the eighth century as a way through which to circulate texts, such as Buddist teachings; the selected image and the Japanese text would be printed on the same sheet of paper, side by side or interconnected. The eighteenth century saw the rise of a new technology that allowed artists to print single woodblock prints with multiple colors, instead of needing to hand color each separate...
The end:
.....yo-e Style;” and “Three Kabuki Actors.” Retrieved 7 December 2009. <http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/edop/hd_edop.htm>, <http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/ukiy/hd_ukiy.htm>, and <http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ho/10/eaj/ho_2001.715.4.htm>
“Introduction,” The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams, and Substance. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 2001.
Kita, Sandy. “From Shadow to Substance: Redefining Ukiyo-e,” The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams, and Substance. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 2001.
Library of Congress. The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams, and Substance Exhibition Website, 2004. Retrieved 7 December 2009. <http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/ukiyo-e/major.html>