The Truth in the Courtroom

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Essay #: 055335
Total text length is 8,066 characters (approximately 5.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Truth in the Courtroom
What evidence should be required in making decisions in the court room? Joan Bertin and Mary Henifin discuss scientific evidence in determining court decisions in their article, “Science, Law, and the Search for Truth in the Courtroom: Lessons from Dauber v. Merrell Dow,” while Richard Bedding and N. Dickon
Reppucci
discuss using the evidence of social science in the courtroom. These two articles discuss how scientific evidence and social evidence are used in making decisions in the courtroom and how truth is often based on the attitudes of judges and juries.
First, a summary of the article, “Science, Law, and the Search for Truth in the Courtroom: Lessons from Daubert v. Merrell Dow,” will show how scientific...
The end:
.....r own bias toward the evidence that they are given. While scientific evidence is often considered valid, this is not true in all cases especially if litigation is involved. The same can be stated for social sciences because the people involved have different values and beliefs that affect the way they view a case. Determining the truth in the courtroom is not an easy process even though it often affects the lives of the people involved. How should the truth be decided in a court case?
Works Cited
Bertin, Joan. And Henifin, Mary. “Science, Law, and the Search for Truth in the Courtroom: Lessons from
Daubert
v. Merrell Dow.”
Redding, Richard & Dickon
Reppucci
. “Effects of Lawyers’ Socio-political Social Science in Legal Decision Making.”