“The Soloist” and the Vexing Issue of Treating the Homeless Mentally…

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Essay #: 057390
Total text length is 8,544 characters (approximately 5.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
“The Soloist” and the Vexing Issue of Treating the Homeless Mentally Ill
The most heartbreaking part of “The Soloist” is not that Nathaniel Ayers’ tremendous talent as a musician has been subsumed by his schizophrenia. It is not that he has former teachers, peers and family members who love and miss him. Particularly touching is his former teacher Harry Barnoff, who had spent nearly 50 years as a bassist with the Cleveland Symphony, one of the best orchestras in the world. He began to weep when L.A. Times columnist Steve Lopez contacts him to let him know that Nathaniel is still alive. “You have got to tell him how much I think of him” (Lopez, 2008, p. 17).
What is the most heartbreaking aspect of “The Soloist” is the thorough frustration...
The end:
.....Underserved, 18(4), 744-8. Retrieved February 11, 2010, from Research Library.
Horvitz-Lennon, M., Frank, R., Thompson, W., Baik, S., Alegría, M., Rosenheck, R., &
Normand, S.. (2009). Investigation of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Service Utilization Among Homeless Adults With Severe Mental Illnesses. Psychiatric Services, 60(8), 1032-8. Retrieved February 11, 2010, from Research Library.
Levitt, A., Culhane, D., DeGenova, J., O Quinn, P., & Bainbridge, J.. (2009). Health and
Social Characteristics of Homeless Adults in Manhattan Who Were Chronically or Not Chronically Unsheltered. Psychiatric Services, 60(7), 978-81. Retrieved February 11, 2010, from Research Library.
Lopez, S. (2008). The Soloist. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons.