The Rule of Benedict, Pope Gregory, and the Monastic Missionary

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Essay #: 055186
Total text length is 1,344 characters (approximately 0.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Analysis of The Rule of Benedict, Pope Gregory, and the Monastic Missionary
as a Culturally Unifying Force for Christianity in Medieval Europe
This study will define how the Rule of Benedict provided the scriptural and community based teachings to expand Christianity into a more unified Christian sphere. The rules of St. Benedict dictate a middle ground between the individual (the monk) and the community (the monastery), which allowed Pope Gregory to expand Christian values through the examples of monks and the monasteries in which they dwelled. By using monastic and the example of the monk in daily life, the dualistic clash between pagan life and the Christian life began to dwindle throughout Europe. In essence, by analyzing the Rule...
The end:
.....e monk in daily life, the dualistic clash between pagan life and the Christian life began to dwindle throughout Europe. In essence, by analyzing the Rule of Saint Benedict, monks under Pope Gregory were given greater individual freedoms to act as missionaries outside of the traditional monastery, therefore creating more cultural unity in the expansion of Christianity throughout medieval Europe. 
	The primary importance of Saint Benedict in the Roman Catholic Church under Pope Gregory was that his Rule of Saint Benedict allowed for monks to be far more individualistic and less confined to monasteries. Culturally, monks of the Benedictine monasteries could wander around the countryside or live a hermetic life. This type of monk was called an