The Public and Private Sphere: Understanding the Structure of Persepolis

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Essay #: 059363
Total text length is 9,609 characters (approximately 6.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Public and Private Sphere: Understanding the Structure of Persepolis
Superficially,
Marjane
Satrapi’s
Persepolis has a relatively straightforward narrative: it begins with the protagonist,
Marjane
Satrapi
, re-counting the formative years of her youth during the formative years of what is now modern Iran. And therefore, revolution, both personal and state, figures largely in the text. These respective revolutions are characterized by confusion. And this should not be surprising. Whenever there is great change, either personal or impersonal, truths become hidden and misinterpreted, due simply to the turbulence of the times. For the text, Persepolis, however, there is no arbitrary construction of confusion. The text is structured with...
The end:
.....nique is most apparent through the image of female hair. Hair is not an important part of the modern understanding of Iran for no reason: instead, the reason is that language has major implications for the real; it controls and shapes how the world is perceived. The Iranian government speaks of hair in religious terms because these words seem to justify the repression. The western reader too focuses on hair; because this focus lets them construct a language of Iran that justifies sanctions and general discrimination against the state. Both of these languages are in need of constant analysis.
Works Cited
Boyd, Jane. “Language and Body Theory.” Women Studies 224. 12 January 2010.
Satrapi
,
Marjane
. Persepolis. New York: Pantheon Books, 2003.