The Power and Authority of Women in Native-Canadian Society

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Essay #: 060735
Total text length is 11,386 characters (approximately 7.9 pages).

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The beginning:
The Power and Authority of Women in Native-Canadian Society
In Western societies women have traditionally had a relatively low status. They had very little power or authority and were largely subservient to men(Anderson 55). However, this is not always the case in non-western society. In particular women in many Native-Canadian societies in the 17th and 18th centuries seemed to possess power and authority that would have been unimaginable for women in western societies.
However, the status of women in Native-Canadian society is highly controversial. There are mixed reports on how much power native women actually possessed. Many sources indicate that women in native societies possesses power and authority that was equal or greater then the...
The end:
..... may have distorted the perceptions of women’s roles in native societies.
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