The Marsh Plan and Dominion- Province Conference on Reconstruction

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Essay #: 061190
Total text length is 7,277 characters (approximately 5.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Marsh Plan and Dominion- Province Conference on Reconstruction
This paper will analyze what the debate surrounding the Marsh Plan and Dominion- Province Conference on Reconstruction tell us about public attitudes towards post-war social programs. The programs were intended to help the poor, but as the paper will argue the public attitudes towards both Marsh Plan and Dominion- Province Conference on Reconstruction were shaped by the previous experiences within the province and national issues between Anglo- Saxons and French Canadians.
The Marsh Plan was presented to Canadians during World War II. The imitative behind the plan was to prevent a post- war economic depression, similar to the Great Depression that swept through the world...
The end:
.....s have no government but have fraternity as the top political good. Public philosophy can be understood as a “set of political ideas and believes that enjoy widespread acceptance” (
Manzer
13). Public philosophy is generally not formed only from a single political ideology. Thus,
Manzer
provides three interpretations of Canadian public philosophy. Each interpretation presents this philosophy as an amalgam of different political ideologies: as a combination of French-Catholic conservatism and English liberalism, as a symbiosis of conservatism, liberalism and socialism and finally as liberalist- conservative alliance.
Works cited:
Manzer
, Ronald. Public Policies and Political Development in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.