The Limitations of Modern Sight

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Essay #: 062941
Total text length is 5,896 characters (approximately 4.1 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Limitations of Modern Sight
Mark Strand’s “The Tunnel” is a poem that is powerfully concerned with sight. The protagonist is tormented by what his eyes reveal to him – that is, a stranger who silently stands outside of his house. The stranger, conversely, appears not to be able to see. Despite the protagonist’s best efforts, there is no sense of recognition in the stranger’s eyes. In despair the protagonist constructs a tunnel to escape the sight of the stranger. Upon exiting the tunnel, there is an interesting reversal, and the protagonist appears to be unable to see. The careful control of sight in “The Tunnel” suggests that traditional, modern life blinds the individual to their link with other humans.
The protagonist represents the...
The end:
..... traditional, modern life blinds the individual to their link with other humans. The protagonist’s journey – from one watching someone outside his home, to someone being watched by another – is central to the poem. If the journey is traced, there seems to be a singular control of sight – the home. The modern individual, locked safely away in their home is terrified of human interaction. The stranger on the lawn, if the reader is to consider the protagonist’s transformation, asks only for help. Instead of help, however, he is me with suspicion and anger. The modern home is damaging to the individual’s ability to truly see.
Works Cited
Strand, Mark. “The Tunnel” The Hudson Book of Poetry. New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2002. 128-129.