The French-English Rivalry in the Fur Trade in Canada

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Essay #: 055146
Total text length is 25,993 characters (approximately 17.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The French-English Rivalry in the Fur Trade in Canada
Introduction
In 1763, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris, the French Empire in North America came to an end. In the context of early Canada, this treaty marked the end of decades of frequently violent rivalry between the French and the English for control of the lucrative fur trade. In point of fact, however, this political recognition of English military success merely echoed a widely acknowledged economic reality in Canada: the English achievement of dominance in the continent’s fur trade.
This essay will examine the history of this rivalry between the French and the English in the Canadian fur trade to 1763. With reference to a range of sources, the thesis will be argued that...
The end:
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