The French Building Sites of Versailles and Chartres Cathedral

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Essay #: 061705
Total text length is 5,257 characters (approximately 3.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The French Building Sites of Versailles and Chartres Cathedral
Notre Dame de Chartres, also known as Chartres Cathedral (Figure 1), was first created in the eleventh century, but was rebuilt between 1194 and 1260 due to several bouts with lightening and fire in the town of Chartres, which is located approximately 50 miles away from the capital of France, Paris (Sacred Destinations). France’s citizens felt such a strong relationship with the church and its namesake, St. Mary, that they sent in donations to rebuild the church after its last lightening strike in 1194 (Sacred Destinations). Having been rebuilt in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, Chartres’ structure is typical of a French Gothic Cathedral. Like many other Gothic structures...
The end:
.....Revolution.
Images
Figure 1. Chartres Cathedral, 1194-1260, Chartres, France.
Figure 2. Flying Buttresses and Stained Glass Windows, Chartres Cathedral, 1194-1260, Chartres, France.
Figure 3. Drawing of Palace, Gardens, and Grounds of Versailles, c.1690, Versailles, France.
Figure 3. Hall of Mirrors, Versailles, c.1690, Versailles, France.
References
Chateau Versailles. “The Palace of Versailles.” Retrieved 22 July 2010, <http://en.chateauversailles.fr/discover-estate>
Dyer, Kim. “Versailles,” 1995. Retrieved 22 July 2010, <http://www.castles.org/castles/Europe/Western_Europe/France/france6.htm>
Sacred Destinations. “Chartres Cathedral.” Retrieved 22 July 2010, <http://www.sacred-destinations.com/france/chartres-cathedral>