The Core Element in Canada’s Emerging Hockey Mythology

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Essay #: 052163
Total text length is 5,757 characters (approximately 4.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Some have argued that hockey’s attachment to a hypermasculine vision of “Canadianness” enabled it to become the core element in Canada’s emerging hockey mythology. Given what you have read thus far from the course material (the introduction and first four chapters of Hockey Night in Canada as well as On The Edge), discuss this statement and its relevance/importance to the development of hockey in this country.
It has been argued that hockey’s attachment to a hypermasculine vision of “Canadianness” enabled it to become the core element in Canada’s emerging hockey mythology – a mythology that remains pervasive to this day. This essay will show that this statement is accurate, and continues to be both relevant and important to the development...
The end:
..... an administration that steps in to ensure that if the lesson is not learned in the cradle, it is learned on the rinks – or rather, on the outskirts of the rink, where those “in skirts” must remain as ice time and funding is given only to their brothers. Finally, it is reinforced by a pervasive media that lauds the hypermasculinity of male hockey, while ignoring or belittling the often striking achievements of women. 
Bibliography
Etue, Elizabeth & Williams, Megan K. On the Edge: Women Making Hockey History. Toronto, Second Story Press, 1996.
Gruneau, Richard & Whitson, David. Hockey Night in Canada: Sport, Identities and Cultural Politics. Toronto: Garamond Press, 1993.
Shubert, Irwin. Hockey in Canadian Popular Culture. SFU, 2009.