The Controversial Language of “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

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Essay #: 066258
Total text length is 9,942 characters (approximately 6.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Controversial Language of "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a book set in the late nineteenth century in the state of Missouri. It begins as a continuation of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, also by Mark Twain, which was written a few years before Huckleberry Finn. Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn are young white teenage boys who plan adventures and spend a lot of their time ending up in bad situations. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn concentrates on Huck Finn, who fakes his own death and then runs away from home because his father, who is abusive and a drunk, has taken him back and locks Huck up all day long, with nothing to do. When Huck pretends to die and runs away, he finds a black...
The end:
.....same time and place with the book’s characters and gives a very strong and important realistic tone and narrative voice to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Works Cited
Bosman
, Julie. “Publisher Tinkers with Twain,” The New York Times, January 4, 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2011, <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/05/books/05huck.html?scp=7&sq=huckleberry%20finn&st=cse>
Kakutani
, Michiko. “Light Out, Huck, They Still Want to
Sivilize
You,” The New York Times, January 6, 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2011, <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/07/books/07huck.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=huckleberry%20finn&st=cse>
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York and London: Harper and Brothers Publishers, 1884 and 1918.