The CIO Who Knew and Said to Much: The Story of Overstock.com’s CIO

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Essay #: 057593
Total text length is 7,811 characters (approximately 5.4 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The CIO Who Knew and Said to Much: The Story of Overstock.com’s CIO
Organizations are inherently political institutions; to deny that is to deny the very functionality of the modern corporate environment. As with all organizations, information is power. With increased access and retention of information comes the correlative phenomenon of increased power within the organization. As a direct result of this power increase the underlying paradigm begins to shift. Likewise if the information is handled and disseminated in a manner that is inconsistent with acceptable corporate practices the consequences could be severe, long lasting and quite damaging. This analysis will focus on the political dynamics of Overstock.com’s Chief Information...
The end:
..... stand on principle like Mr. Schwegman has attempted to do.
References
Finney, R. (1999) The Politics of Information and Projects. ITMWEB White Paper. Retrieved February 20, 2010, from http://www.itmweb.com/essay008.htm
Schuman, E. (2005) The CIO Who Admitted Too Much. CIOInsight. Retrieved February 20, 2010, from http://www.cioinsight.com/article2/0,1540,1852559,00.asp
Strassman, P.A. (1994) The Politics of Information Management: Policy Guidelines. Information Economics Press. Retrieved February 20, 2010, from http://www.infoeconomics.com/info-politics.php.
Strassmann, P.A. (2005) Check: How to Verify if You are Important. CIOInsight . July 8, 2005. Retrieved February 20, 2010, from http://www.cioinsight.com/article2/0,1540,1849919,00.asp