The Chasm in Faulkner’s “Golden Land” and Capote’s “Hollywood”

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Essay #: 053844
Total text length is 5,319 characters (approximately 3.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Chasm in Faulkner’s “Golden Land” and Capote’s “Hollywood”
“He could have seen the city in the bright, soft, vague hazy sunlight, with so many gay scraps of paper blown without order, with its curious air of being rootless (Faulkner 145).” This quote embodies the idea that light- specifically the sunlight of the Los Angeles Area- shines on everything. Faulkner’s “gay scraps of light,” are people of every age, race, class and order, all going to Los Angeles to create a better life for themselves and their families. Often, the dreams and hopes that shine through the light of Los Angeles don’t turn out for the best, but all Los Angeles light reeks of hope and inspiration, or at least the potential for these things. The democratic quality...
The end:
.....uccess comes with disaster, and how the two are interchangeable. Certainly, one can explore the link between one and another. Everyone can agree, however, that the quality of light inspires both of these things in Los Angeles residents, newcomers and visitors. Light can be inspiring and hold great potential, but also great risk and disaster. Both sides of this light is important in understanding the nature of Los Angeles and the struggle of the people within the city.
Bibliography
Capote, Truman. “Hollywood.” Writing Los Angeles. USA: The Library of America,
2002.
Faulkner, William. “Golden Land.” Writing Los Angeles. USA: The Library of
America, 2002.
Wechsler, Lawrence. “L.A. Glows.” Writing Los Angeles. USA: The Library of
America, 2002.