The Blended Family: Its Effects on Children Across Age Groups

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 053169
Total text length is 16,905 characters (approximately 11.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Blended Family: Its Effects on Children Across Age Groups
The concept of what constitutes a family has changed many times throughout history. The first family was probably a unit developed for protection and genetic self-preservation; that is, a female, particularly one with young, would have a better chance at survival when paired with a strong male who could provide for her. This kind of relationship eventually evolved into what we know today as the “nuclear” family, with up to several generations of one family line living in close proximity with one another, often in the same household.
The family, however, continues to evolve. Today, the nuclear family is becoming less common, while the occurrence of the blended family is becoming...
The end:
.....on. Retrieved July 20, 2009 from http://www.stepinstitute.ca/stepfamily_dragons.php
McQuillan
, K., & Ravanera, Z. R. (2006). Canada’s changing: Implications for individuals and society. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
Rigg, A., & Pryor, J. (2007). Children’s perceptions of families: What do they really think? Children & Society, 21(1), 17-30.
Statistics Canada. (n. d.). Canada: The proportion of “traditional” families continues to decline. Minister of Industry, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Retrieved July 19, 2009 from http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/analytic/companion/fam/canada.cfm#traditional_families
Statistics Canada. (2002). General social survey--Cycle 15. Minister of Industry, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.