Technology in the Workplace: A Tool to Control Workers

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 053723
Total text length is 13,067 characters (approximately 9.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Technology in the Workplace: A Tool to Control Workers
The article “High Tech Sweatshop” highlights the hardships entailed in working in what many might consider a top job: that of IT systems engineer. As a highly paid worker in the elite industry that keeps almost everything in the world working (that is, IT), such a worker might be envied, and might be thought to have reached the pinnacle of the opportunities available to ordinary working people. It might be thought that such a worker has escaped Marx’s dire prediction that the proletariat workers will always be ruthlessly exploited by the owners of the means of production. After all, we no longer have just workers and the owners of the means of production – we now also have workers who...
The end:
.....on, Ray. New Production Concepts, New Production Geographies? Reflections on Changes in the Automobile Industry. 2005. Retrieved from web site: http://saturn.bids.ac.uk/cgi-bin/ds_deliver/1/u/d/ISIS/16639447.1/rgs/tibg/1994/00000019/00000003/art00005/19C028350C7B818C11109106219DFC73277239F257.pdf?link=http://www.ingentaconnect.com/error/deliveryandformat=pdf
Noble, David F. The Religion of Technology: The Divinity of Man and the Spirit of Invention. USA: Alfred A. Knopf, Penguin Books, 1999.
Van Dijk, Jan A.G.M. The Deepening Divide: Inequality in the Information Society. California: Sage Publications, 2005.
Webster, Frank. Theories of the Information Society (Third Edition). London and New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 1995.