Split between Engineering and Architecture during the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

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Essay #: 059769
Total text length is 301,055 characters (approximately 207.6 pages).

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The beginning:
Split between Engineering and Architecture during the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
This paper discusses the split between engineering and architecture during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries – a process brought about by the introduction of new materials and by the corresponding change in materials used (or by modification in terms of how old materials were used) - and how it was resolved. This paper will not be simply a dry historical description of the issue but will be a constructive critique of the question that will compare and contrast both architecture and engineering but also the eighteenth century to the nineteenth century in terms of what key new (or reworked) building blocks emerged.
Ultimately, the schism between...
The end:
.....ethod for the shuttle to be thrown mechanically back and forth across the loom. This greatly speeds up the previous hand process, and it halves the labour force. Where a broad-cloth loom previously required a weaver on each side, it can now be worked by a single operator.Until this point the textile industry has required four spinners to service one weaver. Kay's innovation, in wide use by the 1750s, greatly increases this disparity. Either there must now be many more spinners, or spinning machines must achieve a similar increase in productivity.
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Read more: http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=aa37#ixzz0lzDDEHNU