Social Learning Theory

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Essay #: 055873
Total text length is 7,593 characters (approximately 5.2 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Social Learning Theory
Social Learning Theory is the study of how and why people learn new behaviors. New behaviors are learned through observation, punishment and reinforcement in the person’s environment. People who observe positive behavior are more likely to model that behavior. The same is true for negative behavior (“Social Learning Theory”, (
n.d
.).
Albert
Bandura
is known as the father of social learning theory.
Bandura
in his theory explains that observing is the key to modeling behaviors, attitudes and reactions.
Bandura
states, "Learning would be exceedingly laborious, not to mention hazardous, if people had to rely solely on the effects of their own actions to inform them what to do. Fortunately, most human behavior is learned...
The end:
.....n the opposite direction of emotional and mental hurt and pain (Van Wagner, 2009).
Social learning theory then is the study of how people learn how to behave. Old behaviors are replaced with new ones through observation and/or modeling. Positive behaviors and negative behaviors are both learned through observation and modeling (
Bandura
,
n.d
.).
References
Bandura
, A. (
n.d
.). Social Learning Theory. Retrieved November
28, 2009, from http://tip.psychology.org/bandura.html
Social Learning Theory. (
n.d
.) Retrieved November 28, 2009, from
http://teachnet.edb.utexas.edu/~lynda_abbott/Social.html
Van Wagner, K. (2009). Social Learning Theory. November 28,
2009, from http://psychology.about.com/od/developmentalpsychology/a/sociallearning.htm