Satirizing the Human Condition in “The Unknown Citizen” and “Richard Cory”

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Essay #: 061648
Total text length is 6,131 characters (approximately 4.2 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Satirizing the Human Condition: W.H. Auden’s “The Unknown Citizen” and Paul Simon’s “Richard Cory.”
Poetry and other literary forms have the ability to have satire. Satire is, in the opinion of Kirk
Combe
and Brian Connery, “characterized by an attack of censure of vice and evil in society which fuses the aesthetic and ethical” (Combe & Connery 9). Though Combe and Connery’s definition might seem elusive, most poems and stories that use satire seek to show (often dramatically) the problems of the world in hopes of changing these problems. A lot of the time, irony is used to make a satirical point, as well. Irony is something where a conclusion is made through going against simple truths or sayings to create a different meaning. Both...
The end:
.....ging, and want to change the way that things are in order to give human beings a chance to be happy and to be themselves, whatever position in life. This progressive attitude is both poem’s true triumph. In these ways, W.H. Auden’s “The Unknown Citizen” and Paul Simon’s “Richard Cory” successfully dramatic satire and irony to make a point about how the system has to change in favor of humanity.
Works Cited
Auden, W.H. “The Unknown Citizen.” Textbook, editor. Place of Publication: Publishing House, Date of Publication.
Combe, Kirk & Connery, Brian. Theorizing Satire: Essays in Literary Criticism. New York: Palgrave McMillian, 1995.
Simon, Paul. “Richard Cory.” Textbook, editor. Place of Publication: Publishing House, Date of Publication.