Review of “The Prime Minister: The Office and Its Holders Since 1945”

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Essay #: 066356
Total text length is 12,740 characters (approximately 8.8 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
The Prime Minister: The Office and Its Holders Since 1945
Book Review
Peter Hennessey’s book The Prime Minister: The Office and Its Holders Since 1945 is a detailed examination of the most recent Prime Ministers and of the duties associated with that office. It is highly informative, well researched and littered with copious references and footnotes, and yet, despite its passion and information, the book does not come to any definite conclusions about these premiers or the office itself.
The first section of the book, the Prelude, discusses how the “premiership is such a personally shaped instrument that it cannot be understood without an account of how each incumbent operated it” (15). Therefore, Hennessey makes it clear his book “is...
The end:
.....clusions about his subject matter. He even admits, in the midst of his rankings, that the “two most difficult premiers to place are Macmillan and Wilson” (531). After so many concessions regarding his lack of authority, his readers are unable, sadly, to give credit to his opinions.
After reading his book, it is clear that Peter Hennessey is a dedicated, intelligent and passionate writer who is not afraid to throw is own personality into his work. At times his thoroughness works against his clarity, and his humility works against his credibility, but overall his book is entertaining, informative and highly engaging.
Work Cited
Hennessey, Peter. The Prime Minister: The Office and Its Holders
Since 1945. London: Allen Lane Penguin Press, 2000.