Revelations in Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher” and James’s “The Pupil”

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Essay #: 067228
Total text length is 8,750 characters (approximately 6.0 pages).

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The beginning:
Revelations in Poe’s "The Fall of the House of Usher" and James’s "The Pupil"
Point of view and prose style are essential to the narrative voice of any story. The use of the first-person narrative point of view, wherein the narrator is a character in the story, compels the reader to identify with the narrator. True, the narrator both gives and withholds information and therefore may be considered not entirely “reliable”, yet the force of identification is, for the reader (or at least most readers), so enticing as to all but erase any element of mistrust. Also, the use of “I” by the author creates a strong impression that he, the author, is revealing personal information; he is our guide, and his fears, obsessions, doubts, and so on become...
The end:
.....roQuest
document ID: 8670018.
Hustis
, Harriet. "Reading Encrypted but Persistent: The Gothic
of Reading and Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher”.
Studies in American Fiction. 27.1 (Spring 1999). Pp 3-16.
No page numbers in electronic document.
ProQuest
document
ID: 44520092.
James, Henry. “The Pupil”, in Nine Tales. No page numbers in
electronic document.
http://emotional-literacy-education.com/classic-books-online-a/pupil10.htm
Poe, Edgar Allan. “The Fall of the House of Usher” in Tales of
Mystery and Imagination. No page numbers in electronic
document.
http://www.online-literature.com/poe/31/
Zwinger
, Lynda. “Bodies That Don’t Matter: The Queering of
‘Henry James’”. Modern Fiction Studies. West Lafayette:
Fall 1995. 41:3-4. P. 657-675.