Prejudice of Color in the Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories

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Essay #: 054566
Total text length is 6,468 characters (approximately 4.5 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Prejudice of Color in the Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories
Western cultural ideals have largely been unable to penetrate the core values and structures of the cultures in countries of the Caribbean. To an extent, the countries and the people of the Caribbean are buried in poverty, superstition, and abuse of one another. Yet their indigenous values, seemingly savage from an external point of view are nonetheless valid cultural components of a divergent people. Immigration and emigration are consistently important practical threads woven throughout the stories in the Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories edited by Stewart Brown & John Wickham. These threads decidedly impact each narrative, as each story involves the insider, and...
The end:
.....d; however, the inherent magical values were discarded by the outsiders as evil. This reliance upon such forms of evil paradoxically bound and liberated a people from the pressures of subjugation.
Works Cited
Conde, Maryse. “The Breadnut and the Breadfruit”. The Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories. Ed. Stewart Brown & John Wickham. Oxford University Press, USA, 1999. 235-244. Print.
Danticat, Edwindge. “Nineteen Thirty-Seven”. The Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories. Ed. Stewart Brown & John Wickham. Oxford University Press, USA, 1999. 447-455. Print.
Warner-Vieyra, Myriam. “Passport to Paradise”. The Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories. Ed. Stewart Brown & John Wickham. Oxford University Press, USA, 1999. 274-6. Print.