Philosophy and the Meaning of Life: A Critical Analysis

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Essay #: 055184
Total text length is 8,212 characters (approximately 5.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Philosophy and the Meaning of Life: A Critical Analysis
Life is full of misery, loneliness, and suffering - and it's all over much too soon.
- Woody Allen
Robert Nozick, in “Philosophy and the Meaning of Life,” argues that the meaning of life lies in the transcending of limits. This essay will explore Nozick’s conclusion with reference to two arguments advanced by Nozick in support of his contention. Through a critical analysis of these arguments, and a review of their inherent flaws as well as possible remedies for these flaws, it will be concluded that ultimately Nozick does not prove that a meaningful life is one that transcends all limits.
Nozick advances several arguments in support of his contention that meaning in life involves...
The end:
.....gument and possible means of avoiding these flaws. This being said, it must nonetheless be concluded that meaning cannot lie in transcending limits for we – being mortal – are bound by limits whether we choose to recognize them or not. It is how we choose to live within those boundaries that give our life meaning. Life can be meaningful in and of itself, as the Woody Allen quote that opens this essay suggests: “Life is full of misery, loneliness, and suffering - and it's all over much too soon.” Yes, life can be sad, and bleak, and seem meaningless, but in most cases we would all agree it is better than not living.
References
Nozick, Robert. “Philosophy and the Meaning of Life.” In
Philosophical Explanations. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap, 1981,