Offenses in “This is Just to Say” and “My Papa’s Waltz”

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Essay #: 057189
Total text length is 5,411 characters (approximately 3.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Offenses in “This is Just to Say” and “My Papa’s Waltz”
Modernist poetry opens up a whole new world of experiencing poetry in terms of structure, tone and meaning. William Carlos Williams’ “This is Just to Say” and Theodore Roethke’s “My Papa’s Waltz” are no exceptions to this rule. Both poems depict different situations, but both address an offense and one’s experience surrounding an offense. “This is Just to Say” depicts the offense of stealing plums. “My Papa’s Waltz,” depending on the interpretation of the poem, depicts the offense of accidental scraping of a child to full-blown child abuse, depending on interpretation. In terms of society’s canon of offenses- the offenses described in each poem are far divergent, and the poems treat...
The end:
..... different, they both describe offenses. The offense in “My Papa’s Waltz” is hurting a child, but it is treated with a viewpoint of love and nostalgia. The offense seems less grave in “This is Just to Say” but it treated with an unapologetic tone and tense language that makes it a far more serious offense. In Roethke’s poem “My Papa’s Waltz” the offense is treated with love and nostalgia, making it a less serious offense than the grave, tense plum stealing in “This is just to Say.”
Works Cited
Roethke, Theodore. “My Papa’s Waltz.” Selected Readings for English. Del George, Dana, Ed. USA: Cengage Learning, 2006.
Williams, Williams Carlos. “This Is Just To Say.” Selected
Readings for English. Del George, Dana, Ed. USA: Cengage Learning, 2006.