Nursing as Defined by Nightingale

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Essay #: 066020
Total text length is 7,315 characters (approximately 5.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Nursing as Defined by Nightingale
Introduction
Notes on Nursing is not actually for nurses but for all women who care for family members. What the book provides is a different understanding about the causes and prevention of disease. The main problem is that disease is being caused by these women who are attempting to cure it. I have observed that disease is a natural and reparative process (Nightingale, 1860). Of all my 13 concepts, the main one is the environment since it determines the outcome for the patient. The environment determines whether disease will be controlled in both the home and the hospital. Nursing will be most effective when it works with the reparative process.
Most Important Concepts
The most important concept in the...
The end:
.....nment because of its interaction with health.
Conclusion
I viewed my nursing role as a direct calling from God and became a role model and leader. Almost all my beliefs originated in my observation of the environment and its impacts on the patient. I found that nurses can cause harm rather than good for patients. The means to avoid harm is knowledge and use of the information that I have mainly gained through experience.
References
Ellis, H. (2008). Florence Nightingale: Creator of modern nursing and public health pioneer. The Journal of Perioperative Practice, 18(9), 404-405.
Nightingale, F. (1860/1969). Notes on nursing: What it is and what it is not. New York: Dover.
Whyte, A. (2010). Relighting the lamp. Nursing Standard, 24(18), 18-23.