National Identification Cards

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Essay #: 054296
Total text length is 21,827 characters (approximately 15.1 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
National Identification Cards
Introduction
Becoming increasingly popular throughout various government and business institutions, the collection of personal information through extremely portable means for the use of national security purposes has been a subject of much debate (
Schneier
, 2003, p. 204) Much of these apprehensions have to do with data protection and security-based concern, including the possibility that a centralized database would be vulnerable to hackers and identity theft (
Joinson
, 2006, p. 335). Researchers have identified issues of trust, privacy concern, potential benefits, past experiences, cultural attitudes and government initiated consultation as important in deciding whether or not a person is comfortable with...
The end:
.....fication: a panacea for
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