Narrative Style in “The Bear Came Over the Mountain” and “Spring in Fialta”

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 059123
Total text length is 6,638 characters (approximately 4.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
An Compare and Contrast of the Third Person Feminist Narrative Style in “The Bear Came Over the Mountain” by Alice Munro and the Patriarchal Narrative Style of “Spring in Fialta” by Vladimir Nabokov
This literary essay will define the contrasting use of a third person feminist narrative in the style of Munro’s short story, which will be contrasted with the primarily patriarchal first person narrative of Victor in Nabokov’s story. While these two differing narrative styles produce differing ways in which to understand male/female relationship, they both share the devastating lack of intimacy in the male character’s inability to love women. With Victor proving an unreliable narrative in relation to his patriarchal troubles with female...
The end:
.....xually by forcing him to confess these serious moral issues to his wife. In contrast to this, Nabokov uses Victor’s unreliable first person narrative style to define his sexist personality, which also makes him incapable of loving his wife or even his love interests. While Victor and Grant are very similar in their characterization, Munro and Nabokov provide distinctly different narrative styles that define a feminist and patriarchal point of view in these two stories.
Works Cited:
Munro, Alice. “The Bear Came Over the Mountain” in My Mistress’s Sparrow is Dead. Ed. Jeffrey Eugenides. New York: Harper Collins, 2008.
Nabokov, Vladimir. “Spring in Fialta” in My Mistress’s Sparrow is Dead. Ed. Jeffrey Eugenides. New York: Harper Collins, 2008.