Myths and Folktales: Nature and Korean Culture

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Essay #: 071054
Total text length is 6,092 characters (approximately 4.2 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Myths and Folktales: Nature and Korean Culture
The following paper looks at myths and folktales and explores the centrality of nature in the context of Korean culture. This essay explores four of the Foundation Myths, Folk tales and Biographies read to this point and explains the manner in which nature is depicted in each of them. To start, “The Great Flood” is a myth that captures how nature is shown to have benevolent qualities which stamp it is a loyal ally and confidante of humanity if humanity treats it well; by contrast, “The Jewel of the Fox’s tongue” shows nature to be quite unsparing in its brutality of humanity and quite willing to inflict terrible harm upon it. For its part, the biographical tale of Pak
Hyokkose
, “Pak
Hyokkose...
The end:
..... proof that nature cannot be dismissed cavalierly. Overall, the myths and folktales of Korean culture share much in common with aboriginal culture and suggest a society that saw
itself
inextricably linked to nature.
Works Cited
“The great flood.”
Pp.16-18 (additional information not provided by client).
“The Jewel of the Fox’s tongue.”
Pp.18-20 (additional information not provided by client).
“King
Suro
, the Founder of
Karak
.” Anthology of Korean Literature: From early times to the nineteenth century.
Ed. Peter Lee.
Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1981.
12-15.
“Pak
Hyokkose
, the Founder of
Silla
.” Anthology of Korean Literature: From early times to the nineteenth century.
Ed. Peter Lee.
Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1981.
5-6.