Mood and Meaning: The Tin Flute and Making Do

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Essay #: 072802
Total text length is 11,247 characters (approximately 7.8 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Abstract
This paper shall compare Garbrielle Roy’s The Tin Flute with Denyse Baillargeon’s Making Do, noting that the major factor that determines how each narrative develops and resolves is the perspective that each author has when approaching their subjects.
Mood and Meaning: The Tin Flute and Making Do
Both Gabrielle Roy’s The Tin Flute and Denyse Baillargeon’s Making Do: Women, Family and Home in Montreal During the Great Depression provide readers with a view inside of low income neighborhoods and families in Montreal, Quebec. Roy’s use of the Lacasse family focuses on the lives of one family in order to tell the tale of the larger group, while Baillargeon looks to the stories of many, more anonymous families and people in order to...
The end:
.....neighborhood feel restricting, and their future bleak. Similarly, Baillargeon’s need to be neutral and her desire to have her subjects speak for themselves and for her to not sensationalize their lives results in a more balanced, neutral portrayal of the lives of these people at this time.
References
Baillargeon, D., & Klein, Y. M. (1999). Making do: Women, family, and home in Montreal during the Great Depression. Waterloo, Ont: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
Frost, J., Baillargeon, D., & Klein, Y. (July 01, 2001). Review of Making Do: Women, Family and Home in Montreal during the Great Depression. Journal of Social History, 34, 4, 1010-1011.
Roy, G., & Josephson, H. G. (1947). The tin flute. New York: Reynal & Hitchcock.