Making Racialized and Gendered Identities Visible in Dominant Culture

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Essay #: 055840
Total text length is 9,268 characters (approximately 6.4 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Making Racialized and Gendered Identities Visible in Dominant Culture
Ruth Frankenberg’s introductory chapter to her book, White Women: Race Matters. On the Social Construction of Whiteness, sets out the primary arguments and methodologies for her study of white women and race. Frankenberg’s main premise, that white women indeed have a race and are thus deeply affected by their whiteness, seems simple enough at the beginning. Frankenberg complicates matters, however, as she begins to explore the ways in which white women, as with all human beings, live their lives within and through social constructions of intersecting identities. Indeed, Frankenberg strongly emphasizes the idea that her text is a specific analysis of the ways in which a...
The end:
..... gendered, raced, classed, etc. at the same time, which means that each identity informs and builds upon the others to create our multi-dimensional personalities. By recognizing the identities that otherwise would go by the wayside, as Frankenberg does with white women, these scholars challenge our societal structures in the hope of making lasting change.
Bibliography
Hooks, Bell. “Representing Whiteness in the Black Imagination.”
Frankenberg, Ruth. “Introduction. Points of Origin, Points of Departure,” White Women: Race Matters. On the Social Construction of Whiteness.
Razack
,
Sherene
H. (2002). “Gendered Racial Violence and
Spatialized
Justice,” Race, Space and the Law:
Unmapping
a White Settler Society. Toronto: Between the Lines Press.