Legacy, Death and Regeneration in the Animal Story: Charlotte’s Web,…

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Essay #: 051444
Total text length is 13,528 characters (approximately 9.3 pages).

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The beginning:
Legacy, Death and Regeneration in the Animal Story:  Charlotte’s Web, The Wind in the Willows and The Tale of Peter Rabbit
According to Ursula Le Guin in Beyond Genre:  Fiction for Children and Adults, “Animal characters are the major source of the power of the best children’s literature (, 3).”  Certainly, this is true for Charlotte’s Web, The Wind in the Willows and The Tale of Peter Rabbit.  These books have defined children’s literature for generations and for a variety of reasons.  One such reason is the dealing of death, legacy and regeneration within these books.  It is important to introduce weighty issues such as time and mortality to children with skill and tact.  
Charlotte’s Web, The Wind in the Willows and The Tale of Peter...
The end:
..... the Willows and The Tale of Peter Rabbit all should be appreciated for their dealing with death, legacy and regeneration but also for celebrating life in its entirety.  
References
Grahame, Kenneth.  The Wind in the Willows.  USA: 
Wilder Publications, 2007. 
Hunt, Peter & Ray, Sheila G. Bannister. 
International Companion Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature.  New York Routhledge Press, 2004.  
Le Guin, Ursula K.  Beyond Genre:  Fiction for
Children and Adults.  New York:  Routledge Press, 
Potter, Beatrix.  The Tale of Peter Rabbit.  New 
York:  Chronicle Books, 2001. 
 Silvey, Anita.  Children’s Books and Their 
Creators.  New York:  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1995.  
 White, E.B. Charlotte’s Web.  New York:  Harper 
Collins, 1952.