“Lawrence v. Texas” and Due Process

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Essay #: 064663
Total text length is 16,606 characters (approximately 11.5 pages).

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The beginning:
"Lawrence v. Texas" and Due Process
The Constitution of the United States in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments guarantee due process and equal protection under the law (Scalia 5). When a individual feel that they are being treated unfairly, differently than their peers or that they have been deprived by government action, then they can file a federal claim and if unhappy with the judicial outcome can appeal to a District Court, and if still dissatisfied then if warranted the Supreme Court will listen to the appeal make the ultimate and final decision on the matter. These decisions establish precedent and are rarely overruled, and can only be done so by a subsequent action of the Supreme Court.
Prior to the later half of the twentieth...
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.....04. 24 Nov. 2010 <http://www.sodomylaws.org/usa/military/milnews32.htm>.
Scalia, Antonin. “Dissent Opinion – Lawrence v. Texas”. Supreme Court. Cornell U Law School. 2003. 24 Nov. 2010 <http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/02-102.ZS.html>.
Thomas, Clarence. “Dissent Opinion – Lawrence v. Texas”. Supreme Court. Cornell U Law School. 2003. 24 Nov. 2010 <http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/02-102.ZS.html>.
Wagner, David. Hints, not Holdings: The Use of Precedent in Lawrence v. Texas.” BYU Journal of Public Law 18 (2004): 681-693.
Yoshino, Kenji. “Can the Supreme Court Change Its Mind?” The New York Times. 5 Dec. 2002. 24 Nov. 2010 <http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/05/opinion/can-the-supreme-court-change-its-mind.html>.