Langacker and Talmy on Cognitive Linguistics

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Essay #: 062903
Total text length is 7,779 characters (approximately 5.4 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Langacker and Talmy on Cognitive Linguistics
The exploration of even the most simplistic conventions of language can reveal that which may be termed profound. Ronald
Langacker’s
“Nouns and Verbs” and Leonard
Talmy’s
“Fictive Motion in Language and ‘
Ception
’” are suitable examples of the basic conventions of language translating into complex theoretical studies.
Langacker
and
Talmy
both deal with the subtle action of verbs in creating motion in language and thought. First
Langacker
will be explored. Specifically, his analysis of the distinction between perfective and imperfective verbs; and why perfective verbs occur in the simple present, while imperfective verbs often use progressive construction.
Talmy
will be next addressed....
The end:
.....aims. Further, the compatibility has been explained through the two part structure of
Talmy
– that is, of a higher, static geometric form working with a lower, perceived pathway.
Langacker
, instead of insisting on a structure similar to
Talmy
, put an emphasis on the scope of the predication, or in the case explored, the road. Depending on how the road is positioned, it will become either stable or prone to change. While this is a useful way to understand the two ways that the road may be understood,
Talmy’s
explanation is more satisfactory.
Talmy
does not simply stop at scope but instead includes the act of perception – the simultaneous recognition of stability and the tracing of the route. The
factive
cannot function without the fictive.