Knowledge and Reality: The Problems of Sense-data According to Russell

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Essay #: 063016
Total text length is 10,105 characters (approximately 7.0 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Knowledge and Reality: The Problems of Sense-data According to Russell
The ensuing paper explores the work of Bertrand Russell entitled, The Problems of Philosophy. There are some key questions that Russell’s work calls to our attention and, happily, he provides answers to them. For one thing, what is sense-data and what are they supposed to be? What evidence exists for their existence? Finally, how does sense-data lead to sceptical worries? After reviewing Russell’s work, we can conclude that sense-data is what our senses tell us exist in the world at large; we can also conclude that sense-data are supposed to be an accurate reflection or catalogue of the perceptible qualities (physical qualities) of an item or object existing...
The end:
.....– though he leaves open the possibility that our subjective judgments, as derived from our sense-data, may be incorrect. All in all, we can sense things in the real world, these things are independent, and the only thing that is in question is whether our judgments or apprehensions are truly accurate.
Works Cited
Russell, B. (1912). The Problems of Philosophy. Retrieved October 9, 2010 from http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:4G2gi5FdLSAJ:www.feedbooks.com/book/4198.pdf+the+problems+of+philosophy+%2B+feedbooks&hl=en&gl=ca&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESgc5voyBrIrXzIiRxnTDoK9OUY9CD_4pJgTz1etC7adPbUDr4tNmRDEArZR7-881QSDmuVVSiJsQs-jb2aTnnEOKRD_6nMN2MCeJcHf9RoSu94pS9cN2S_DXUx8kdRDf7BJrdFD&sig=AHIEtbSPYxtXk_iFxLv9BWPWrlR1FOsqHw