John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” and the Doctrine of Predestination

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Essay #: 062301
Total text length is 8,773 characters (approximately 6.1 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
John Milton’s "Paradise Lost" and the Doctrine of Predestination
Milton was a vocal proponent for change, both political and religious and his views strongly influenced his poetry. Despite the fact that Milton often aligned himself with the Puritan cause, his religious believes deviated from this doctrine. His religious ideas evolved during his life and were under the influence of not only current politics but his private life as well (
Greenblatt
695). Milton’s radical departure from orthodoxy is presented in his ‘Christian Doctrine’, in which he “denies the Trinity,… insists upon free will against Calvinist predestination, and privileges the inspiration of the Spirit” (
Greenblatt
696). The topic of this paper is Milton’s attitude...
The end:
.....ve free will to use and because he expects true pure love and sincere obedience. True love and sincere obedience do not come from predestination, rather from reasoning and from use of free will. It is exactly Milton’s disbelief in predestination that allows the Biblical characters like Adam and Eve to go on an epic quest of grand proportions described in “Paradise Lost”.
Works Cited:
Milton, John. “Paradise Lost.” In The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. A. 8th ed. Eds. Stephen
Greenblatt
and M. H. Abrams. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2006.
Greenblatt
, Stephen. “John Milton.” In The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. A. 8th ed. Eds. Stephen
Greenblatt
and M. H. Abrams. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2006.