Jesus Christ the Rabbi: An Analysis of the Cross-Cultural Affects of Judaism and Greek Philosophy on Early Christianity

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Essay #: 052352
Total text length is 7,075 characters (approximately 4.9 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Jesus Christ the Rabbi: An Analysis of the Cross-Cultural Affects of Judaism and Greek Philosophy on Early Christianity
This study will analyze the influential synthesis of cross-cultural roles in Judaism and Greek philosophy on that of early Christian interpretations of Christ as rabbi or teacher. Early Christians had essentially evolved from Judaism, as Jesus Christ was himself thought to be a rabbi in the first century. However, the evolution of a “de-Judaization” in the Christian New testament helped to separate Christ from Judaic practices, yet the influence of Platonic thought still abounded in the way Christ was identified as a teacher of the soul. In essence, while Christianity is often thought of as being a separate religion than...
The end:
.....fines this intermeshing cultural value, which dictates a Judaic tradition in the new messianic way that he preached to his followers. By understanding the Platonic values that are also implied in the newly formed Christian Church, Christianity had a wide variety of cross-cultural influences that were so important in the Grecian and Judaic amalgamation of teaching practices that took place in the first century A.D. This study has defined a synthesis of Judaic and Greek cultural values that were vitally important for understanding early Christianity and the role of Christ as rabbi in this early period. 
Works Cited:
Pelikan, Jaroslav. Jesus Through the Centuries: His Place in the History of Culture. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999.