Invasion Biology: To Be or Not to Be?

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Essay #: 072779
Total text length is 19,074 characters (approximately 13.2 pages).

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The beginning:
Invasion Biology: To Be or Not to Be?
The roots of invasion biology are said to date back to the early 1800s in Europe (Kuhn, et al. 2011, Davis 2009). A smattering of research ensued, until the subject was brought to light in 1958 by Charles Elton’s The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, followed by another smattering of research. Twenty-five years after Elton’s seminal tome, the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment or SCOPE, comprised mostly of community biologists, came into being to define contemporary invasion biology in 1983 (Davis 2011;
Simberloff
2010). SCOPE called for scientific research, particularly in the areas of “species traits and local processes” (Davis 2011). Since that time, literature in the...
The end:
.....Available from http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/ecr/summary/v028/28.1.simberloff.html
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