Intervention into the Economy and Society during the Ottoman Empire

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Essay #: 063936
Total text length is 8,327 characters (approximately 5.7 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Intervention into the Economy and Society during the Ottoman Empire
a1.There were a number of mechanisms used by the Ottoman Empire as incentives for peasants,
timar
holders, and
vakifs
to engage in market-related activity. One example was tax exemptions.
Inalcik
(1954) argued that "in some special cases the population of a whole town was given exemption from taxes to insure continued faithfulness" (p. 108). This example could have held true often in the
timars
that were held by
sipâhîs
(
calvarlymen
). These propinquities would naturally be strongholds were faithfulness to the empire would be at its strongest. In addition, the Ottoman Empire had manifold method of market intervention so as to make sure that speculative forces would not...
The end:
.....er began to slowly erode the influence of the Ottoman Empire, these capitulations were summarily judged as being useful or they were tossed out as vestiges of a broken empire. However, this practice still lives on in to a certain extent in the form of “sweetheart contracts” and “pork-barrel projects.”
References
Inalcik
, H. (1954). Ottoman methods of conquest.
Studia
Islamica
2, 103-129. Retrieved from JSTOR database.
Inalcik
, H., and
Quataert
, D. (1996). An economic and social
history of the Ottoman Empire, 1300-1914. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
Steensgaard
, N. (1978). The seventeenth century crisis. In G.
Parker & L. Smith (Eds.), General crisis of the seventeenth century. (32-56). Florence, KY: Taylor & Francis.