Institutions in “The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner” and “The Magdalene Sisters”

$19.95

Add to cart
Essay #: 058631
Total text length is 8,066 characters (approximately 5.6 pages).

Excerpts from the Paper

The beginning:
Institutions in The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner and The Magdalene Sisters:
A Matter of Perspective
The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962) and The Magdalene Sisters (2002) both portray the personal struggle of individuals in institutions (specifically a British reform school for boys and an Irish
labour
camp run by Catholic nuns), yet the films differ considerably in how these institutions and their inmates are represented.
The reform school in Runner is not so oppressive that the boys in its care cannot function and interact freely, and even exercise some degree of rebelliousness (as in the fist-pounding scene in the cafeteria and, especially, the protagonist’s climactic refusal to win the race). At the other extreme...
The end:
.....on’s is determined chiefly by his interest in the character of Smith and whether or not he can transcend the limitations placed on him.
References
Deasy
, Frank. “Drenched in Longing”. Sight & Sound. 5:5. May 1995. p. 33.
Ganley
, Rosemary. “The Magdalene Sisters: fine film about bad religion”. Catholic New
Times. 27:14. Sep 21, 2003. p. 17.
Kemp, Philip. “The Magdalene Sisters”. Sight & Sound. 13:3. March, 2003. pp. 50-52.
Mullan
, Peter. Screenwriter and director: The Magdalene Sisters. 2002. A production of
U.K. and Ireland. Aired on TVO on March 20, 2010.
Sillitoe
, Alan. Screenplay and author of original short story: The Loneliness of the Long
Distance Runner. Tony Richardson, director. 1962. UK. Aired on TVO on
March 20, 2010.